Test Criteria

now browsing by tag

 
 

Coil Roofing Nailers..a Review

Pneumatic nailers and staplers are among the most dangerous construction tools used on jobsites, and can cause serious injuries to both the operator and workers nearby if used improperly. All workers should receive proper training on these tools, including instructions about compressor settings, hose connections, and fastening procedures, before being allowed to use them. And all equipment should be checked before use, carefully maintained, and removed from service if there is any question about its safe functioning.

Here is a “Code of Safe Practices” that every employer should review with workers that use pneumatic tools.

Before You Start

* Only allow experienced, trained, and authorized workers to operate pneumatic nailers and staplers.
* Always wear safety glasses.
* Use hearing protection if working with noisy tools or in a restricted space.
* Inspect tools before connecting them to the air supply.
* Check that all tool mechanisms are attached.
* Tighten all screws securely.
* Ensure that all guards are in place.
* Check compressor and pressure settings before connecting tools.
* Check that tools are correctly and securely connected to the air supply hose, and that hoses are in good shape.
* Always handle a tool as if it’s loaded with fasteners (nails, staples, etc.).
* Disconnect tools from the air supply during cleaning or adjustment. Before clearing any blockage or misfire, be sure that depressing the trigger empties all air and releases all pressure from the tool.
* Only use fasteners recommended by the manufacturer.
* Only permit properly trained people or manufacturers to carry out tool maintenance and service.
* Disconnect tools if left unattended. OSHA requires workers to stay within 25 feet of unattended tools, or disconnect them if farther away.

* Home
* Contact us
* Hitachi Nailer
* Nailer Bostitch
* Paslode Airless Gun
* Paslode Nailer

*
Coil Roofing Nailer

bosticdh rn46 nailer

Click image for best prices on all models

Coil roofing nailer ..a review

By Mike Guertin

Coil roofing nailers are the most abused tools on my jobsite. They withstand blistering rooftop heat under summer sun, take two-story high-dives onto frozen mud in winter, and endure constant grinding as I drag them across 10-grit shingle granules. And that doesnt even account for the grime that builds up inside and outside the tools from working in this merciless environment. So, to say roofing nailers have a tough job is an understatement.
Test Criteria

I field-tested 11 nailersthe Bostitch RN46, Craftsman 18180, DeWalt D51321, Hitachi NV45AB2, Makita AN451, Max CN450R, Paslode 3175-RCU, Porter-Cable RN175A, Ridgid R175RNA, Senco 455XP, and Spotnails VRN45putting them through their turns fastening heavy laminated (aka architectural or dimensional) shingles in cold and moderate weather conditions. While I looked at operational functions (power and recoil, depth-of-drive adjustments, driver blades, and exposure gauges) and ergonomic and durability features (reloading nails, handling, and wear guards), it was power, recoil, and speed that mattered most. At the beginning, middle, and end of the day, I need a nailer that skips across shingles with minimal recoil and flush-drives every nailevery time.
The Driving Force

Power and Recoil. I dont have the gear to objectively test a nailers driving power, so I gauge it with my hammerthe more I have to take my hammer out of my loop to pound down proud heads, the more air pressure I know a nailer needs. Since all the tools in the test specify a pressure operating range of 80120 psi, I set my compressor with an output regulator to 100 psi. I then ran the tank at 110130 for constant air output, which leveled the playing field for all the nailers. Most of my roofs are sheathed with 5/8-inch AdvanTechan exceptionally dense productand I typically install 35-year or better laminated shingles. Like most roofers, I position the shingles and bounce-nail across each course. My speed is greatly influenced by how fast a nailer cycles and how little recoil it has. To maintain top speed, I want little or no recoil so the tool skips across the surface rather than jumping after every nail.

The Max, Hitachi, Senco, DeWalt, Spotnails, Porter-Cable, and Bostitch all drove nails consistently with little recoil. The Makita and Ridgid were noticeably less powerful with medium recoil, leaving occasional proud nail heads. The Craftsman and Paslode needed more power for my roofs. Even with the depth-of-drive dialed to the max and the compressor regulated at 100 psi, the Craftsman couldnt set all the nails on a full row of shingles and the recoil was too strong while bump-nailing. The Paslode recoiled a little less but was also underpowered, and without a depth adjustment there was no way to increase drive depth to compensate.
Photo: David Sharpe
The nose-mounted depth-of-drive adjustment on the Bostitch is easy to dial-in.

Drivers. Drivers are among the most expensive replacement parts on a roofing nailer, and as they wear down nail heads dont set flat. The good news is that you can grind a driver two or three times before it becomes too short and needs replacing.

Learn more at the website in the resources below.